Supreme Court to Review Asylum-Seeker Expedited Review

Mario A. Godoy
Supreme Court to Review Asylum-Seeker Expedited Review

The United States Supreme Court justices agreed on Friday, October 18, 2019, to consider the Trump administration’s effort to speed up the deportation of thousands of migrants without allowing them federal court hearings. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled earlier this year that efforts to remove asylum-seekers under “expedited review” procedures violated their constitutional rights.

The ABA Journal reports,

In the Obama administration, the expedited removal process applied to immigrants detained at the border less than two weeks after their arrival. The Trump administration is seeking to expand expedited removal to include individuals found anywhere in the country within two years of their entry.

Expedited review of removal has been a point of contention in recent months, as the Trump administration has moved to expand the procedure and cast a wider net over undocumented immigrants subject to it, says CNN.

In November, the Court will hear another immigration case with arguments for ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program created in 2012 by President Barack Obama, and a decision from the Court is expected in early 2020 during the 2020 presidential campaigns.

Non-citizens who face the threat of deportation may be able to show that the U.S. government was wrong to place them into removal proceedings. In immigration court, the presiding judge may ask the non-citizen to address the Notice to Appear by admitting or denying factual accusations and conceding or contesting any charges of removability. You should review the Notice To Appear with a qualified deportation defense attorney prior to entering your pleadings.

The experienced immigration attorneys at Godoy Law Office in Chicago and Lombard can help you with your deportation or removal immigration case. If you need help with an immigration issue, please contact our office or call us at 855-554-6369. 

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