Will The U.S. Allow Me To Be A Dual Citizen?

Mario A. Godoy
Will The U.S. Allow Me To Be A Dual Citizen?

Being a dual citizen means that you are a legal citizen of two different countries at the same time. United States laws do not require a person to choose one nationality or another. This video discusses the three ways that a U.S. citizen can have dual nationality.

WATCH: Chicago Immigration Lawyer Mario Godoy discusses how to be a dual citizen


Transcript

In this video, we’re going to answer the question of whether the U.S. will allow me to be a dual citizen.
Now, a green card holder remains a citizen of his or her country of origin or citizenship.  Generally, in order to become a U.S. citizen,  a green card holder will have to go through a process that’s called naturalization. Part of that naturalization process requires a renunciation of allegiances to other countries.
However, in some instances, your country of origin may still allow you to keep your citizenship. The U.S. law holds that a U.S. citizen is not precluded from dual nationality that’s obtained in one of three ways: 
First, through the naturalization in the U.S. when the foreign state does not divest its citizen of their citizenship upon
naturalization.
Second, through birth in the U.S. to nationals of a country that allows someone to become a citizen simply because their parent was a citizen of that country.
Third, through the naturalization of a U.S. citizen in a foreign country that does not require that the U.S. citizen renounce their U.S. citizenship.
Dual nationals should always use their U.S. passports to enter and to leave the United States.
If you have any immigration or citizenship questions call us for a consultation. 

Illinois Immigration Attorney

United States immigration laws can be extraordinarily complicated. The attorneys at Chicago’s Godoy Law Office fight for the rights of immigrants in Illinois and help immigrants navigate the complex and numerous immigration policies, procedures, and regulations. If you need help with an immigration issue, please contact our office at 855-554-6369.  

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